General information and resources for students and adult learners.

Jacaranda Tree


Common NameJacaranda
Botanical Name: Jacaranda Mimosifolia. The species name mimosifoloia refers to the foliage, which resembles that of the mimosa or wattle tree.
Jacaranda grow around 10-15m (30-45ft) tall and have lacy green foliage which turns yellow in autumn before falling. The trumpet-shaped flowers appear before the leaves return, then drop to form a blue carpet underneath the tree. The color of the flowers varies from soft blue through to mauve-blue and almost purple.

The Jacaranda, is a native of the dry, high plains of Brazil and Argentina, jacarandas are popular in Australia and some people think they're Australian natives.
Jacarandas prefer sunny position, rich well-drained soil and protection from wind and frost when still young. One important thing to remember is that it's better not to prune jacarandas because after pruning they send up lots of ugly vertical shoots that spoil the appearance of the tree. Jacarandas grow well in most areas of Australia with the exception of the mountains and Hobart.
Jacaranda gives a spectacular display of blue-mauve flowers which create an attractive carpet when they fall to the ground. It has pretty foliage and low maintenance. It looks great for any average to large garden. Jacaranda also makes excellent street trees.

Jacaranda Festival 
In Australia, Jacaranda's flowering time is October. The best place to see to see the magnificent spring display of flowering jacarandas is during the Jacaranda Festival held yearly in Grafton, Northern Rivers New South Wales when the street are lined with vibrant purple blooms.
History tells us that in 1879, a Grafton seed merchant by the name of Mr H. A. Volkers was contracted to plant trees for the Grafton Council and during 1880 he was instrumental in supplying and planting hundreds of Jacaranda trees in the streets of Grafton.
In 1935, 55 years, after planting those Jacaranda trees, the people of Grafton held the first Jacaranda Festival, to celebrate the magnificent spectacle of the hundreds of lilac-blossomed trees which grow in Grafton's broad tree lined avenues. This festival expresses the people's thanksgiving for the generosity with which nature blesses this part of the globe.


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