Sunday, August 28


A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains 30 English Proverb that start with letter A. 

1.  A bad excuse is better than none. 
Explanation: It is better to attempt to give some kind of explanation even a week one.
2.  A bad workman blames his tools.
Explanation: Often used as a comment on someone 's excuses for their lack of success.
3.  A barking dog never bites
Explanation: Noisy threats often do not indicate real danger.
4.  A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
Explanation: It is better to accept what one has than to try to get more and risk losing everything.
5.  A burnt child dreads the fire.
Explanation: The memory of past hurt may act as a safeguard in the future. 
6.  A carpenter is known by his chips.
Explanation: The nature of a person's occupation or interest is demonstrated by the traces left behind
7.  A cat may look at a king.
Explanation: Even someone in a lowly position has a right to observe a person of power and influence.
8.  A clean conscience is a good pillow.
Explanation: A clear conscience enables its possessor to sleep soundly.
9.  A fox may grow grey, but never good.
Explanation: Ageing will not change a person's essential nature.
10.  A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
Explanation: Awareness of one’s own guilt has the same effect as an accusation.
11.  A nod's as good as a wind to a blind horse.
Explanation: The slightest hint is enough to convey one's meaning in a particular case.
12.  A shut mouth catches no flies.
Explanation: A warning against the dangers of idle talk.
13.  A stitch in time saves time.
Explanation: A small timely intervention will ensure against the need for much more substantial repair later.
14.  A tree is known by its fruit.
ExplanationA person is judged by what they do and produce.
15.  A trouble shared is a trouble halved.
Explanation: Discussing a problem will lessen its impact.


English Proverbs With Explanation

16.  A creaking door hangs longest.
Explanation: Someone who is apparently in poor health may well cultivate the ostensibly stronger. 
17.  A drowning man will clutch at a straw. 
Explanation: When hope is slipping away one grasps at the slightest chance. 
18.  A hedge between keeps friendship green. 
Explanation: It is wise to have a clear boundary between neighbours.
19.  An idle brain is the devil's workshop. 
Explanation: Those who do not apply themselves to their work are most likely to get into trouble.  
20.  An ounce of practice is worth a pound of precept
Explanation: A small amount of practical assistance is worth more than a great deal of advice.
21. A penny saved is a penny earned
Explanation: Used as an encouragement to be thrifty.
22.  All’s well that end well. 
Explanation: Often used with the implication that difficulties have been successfully negotiated.
23.  All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. 
Explanation: Warning against a lifestyle without any form of relaxation. 
24.   All that glitters is not gold.
Explanation: An attractive appearance is not necessarily evidence of intrinsic value.
25.  After a storm comes a calm. 
Explanation: Often used with the implication that a calm situation is only achieved after stress and turmoil. 
26.  A watched pot never boils. 
Explanation: To pay too close an attention to the development of a desired event appears to inhibit the result.
27. All is fish that comes to the net. 
Explanation: Everything can be used to advantage.
28.  A bleating sheep loses a bite. 
Explanation: Opportunities may be lost through idle hatter. 
29. A slice off a cut loaf isn't missed. 
Explanation: If someone has already been diminished or damaged, further damage may go unnoticed. 
30.  Appearances are deceptive.
Explanation: The outward form of something may not be a true guide to its real nature.

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Friday, August 26


A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains 10 English Proverb that starts with letter B. 

1.  Beauty is in the eye of the beholder
Explanation: Beauty is not judged objectively, but according to the beholder’s estimation.
2.  Beauty is only skin deep
Explanation: Physical beauty is no guarantee of a good character or temperament.
3.  Better are small fish than an empty dish.
Explanation: A little is preferable to nothing at all.
4.  Better be safe than sorry.
Explanation: Urging the wisdom of taking precautions.

5.  Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
Explanation: Take advantage of what is available now, rather than waiting for possible advantages later. 
6.  Better late than never
Explanation:  Even if one missed the first chance o doing something, it is better to attempt it than no to do it at all.
7.  Better the devil you know than the devil you don't
Explanation: Understanding of the nature of a danger may give one an advantage and is preferable to something which is completely unknown and which may well be worse. 
8.  Birds of the same feather flock together.
Explanation: People of the same (usually unscrupulous) character tend to associate.
9.   Business before pleasure.
Explanation: Often used to encourage a course of action.
10.   Blue are the hills that are far away. 
Explanation: A distant view lends enchantment.
11.  Blood is thicker than water.
Explanation: In the end family ties will always count.
12.  Beggars can't be choosers.
Explanation: Someone who is destitute is in no position to criticize what may be offered. 





Posted by Questa Learn On 8/26/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Wednesday, August 24



A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter C. 

1.  Charity begins at home.
Explanation: You should look first to needs in your immediate vicinity.
2.  Cold hands, warm heart.
Explanation: An outward sign may contradict an inward reality.
3.  Curses, like chicken, come home to roost.
Explanation: Ill will directed at another is likely to rebound on the originator.

4. Cut your coat, according to your cloth.
Explanation: Actions taken should suit one's circumstances or resources. 
5.  Constant dropping wears away a stone.
Explanation: Primarily used to mean that persistence will achieve a difficult or unlikely object. 



Posted by Questa Learn On 8/24/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Tuesday, August 23


A range of English proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter D. 

1.  Diligence is the mother of good luck.
Explanation: Success results more from application and practice than from good fortune.
2. Dog does not eat dog
Explanation: People of the same profession should not attack each other.
3.  Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched.
Explanation: One should not make or act upon an assumption which may turn out to be ill-founded. 
4.  Don’t cross the bridge till you come to it.
Explanation: Warning that you should not concern yourself with possible difficulties unless and until they arise.
5.  Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.
Explanation:  You should not change everything on a single venture but spread the risk.
6.  Do not meet troubles halfway.
Explanation: Warning against anxiety about something that has not yet happened.

7. Don't put the cart before the horse.
Explanation: Don't reverse the proper order of things.




Posted by Questa Learn On 8/23/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Monday, August 22


A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter E. 

1.  Easy come, easy go.
Explanation: Something which is acquired without effort will be lost without regret.

2.  Eagle don't catch flies.
Explanation: Great or important persons do not concern themselves with trivial matters. 
3. Empty vessels make the most sound.
Explanation: Foolish and empty-headed people make the most noise.
4.  Every dog has his day.
Explanation: Everyone, however insignificant has a moment of strength and power. 

5. Everybody's business is nobody's business.
Explanation: When something is of some interest to everyone, no single person takes full responsibility for it. 
6.  Experience is the best teacher.
Explanation: Sometimes used with the implication that learning by experience may be painful.

Posted by Questa Learn On 8/22/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Sunday, August 21


A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter F. 

1.  Familiarity breeds contempt.
Explanation: We value least the things which are most familiar.
2. Full cup, steady hand.
Explanation: Used specially to caution against spoiling a comfortable or otherwise happy situation by a careless action.
3.  Fire is a good servant, but a bad master.
Explanation: Acknowledging that fire is both essential for living and potentially destructive.
4.  Fine feathers make fine birds
Explanation: Beautiful clothes confer beauty or style on the wearer.

5. Forewarmed is forearmed.
Explanation: If one has been warned in advance about a problem one can make preparations for dealing with it.

Posted by Questa Learn On 8/21/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Saturday, August 20


A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter H. 

1.  Hasty climbers have sudden falls.
Explanation: The over-ambitious often fail to take necessary precautions.

2. Haste makes waste.
Explanation: Hurried work is likely to be wasteful. 

3.  He who pays the piper call the tune.
Explanation: The person financially responsible for something can control what is done.
4. Honey catches more flies than vinegar.
Explanation: Soft words achieve more than sharpness. 

Posted by Questa Learn On 8/20/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Wednesday, August 17


A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter I. 

1. It is easy to find a stick to beat a dog.
Explanation: It is easy to find reasons to critize someone who is vulnerable.
2.  It is never too late to mend.
Explanation: One can always try to improve.
3.  It is not work that kills, but worry.
Explanation: Direct effort is less stressful than constant concern
4.  It's ill waiting for dead men's shoes. 
Explanation: Often used for a situation in which one is hoping for a position currently occupied by another
5.  It takes all sort to make a world. 
Explanation:  Often used in recognition that a particular group may encompass a wide range of character and background.
6. It takes two to make a bargain.
Explanation: Often used to imply that both parties must be prepared to give some ground.  

6.  If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.
Explanation: What one wishes for is often far from reality. 




Posted by Questa Learn On 8/17/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Monday, August 15


A range of English proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter L. 

1.  Let sleeping dog lie.
Explanation: Something which may be dangerous or difficult to handle is better left undisturbed.
2. Like father like son
Explanation: Often used to call attention to similarities in behaviour
3.  Look before you leap.
Explanation: Used to advise caution before committing oneself to a course of 
4.  Love your neighbor, but don't pull down your hedge.
Explanation:  Do not let feelings of friendship lead you to act unwisely. 
5.  Less is more.
Explanation: Something simple often has more effect. 

6. Lightning never strikes the same place twice.
Explanation: Often used as an encouragement that a particular misfortune will not be repeated. 

7.  Little pitchers have large ears.
Explanation: Children overhear what is not meant for them (a pitcher's ears are its handles).

8.  Lucky at cards, unlucky in love.
Explanation: Suggesting that good fortune in gambling is balanced by lack of success in love. 

 


Posted by Questa Learn On 8/15/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Sunday, August 14


A collection of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverbs that start with letter M.   

1.  Many hands make light work.
Explanation: Often used as an encouragement to join in with assistance.

2. Many go out for wool and come home shorn.
Explanation: Many who seek to better themselves or make themselves rich end by losing what they already have.

3. Man cannot leave by bread alone
Explanation: A person needs spiritual as well as physical sustenance. 
4.  Make hay while the sun shines.
Explanation: One should take advantage of favourable circumstances which may not last. 






Posted by Questa Learn On 8/14/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Friday, August 12


A collection of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverbs that start with letter N.   

1.  No pain, no gain
Explanation: Nothing worth having can be achieved without effort.

2. No time like the present.
Explanation: Often used to urge swift and immediate action. 
3.  New lords, new laws
Explanation: New authorities are likely to change existing rules. 

4. No smoke without fire.
Explanation: Rumor is generally founded on fact
5.  Nothing venture, nothing gain.
Explanation: One must be prepared to take some risks to gain a desired end. 
6.  Nothing so bad but it might have been worse.
Explanation: Used in resignation or consolation
7.  Necessity is the mother of invention.
Explanation:  Need is often the motive to the creative process. 
8. Necessity knows no law.
Explanation: Someone  in extreme need will disregard rules of prohibitions.

9. New brooms sweep clean.
Explanation: Often used in the context of someone newly appointed to a post who is making changes in personnel and procedures. 




Posted by Questa Learn On 8/12/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Wednesday, August 10


A collection of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter O.   

1.  Old habits die hard.
Explanation: It is difficult to break long-established habits
2.  Opportunity never knocks twice at any man's door.
Explanation: A chance once missed will not occur again.  
3.  Out of fullness of the heart the mouth speaks.
Explanation: Overwhelming feeling will express itself in speech
4.  Out the mouth of babes
Explanation: Young children may sometimes speak with disconcerting wisdom.

5. One step at a time.
Explanation: Recommending cautious progression along a desired route. 
6.  Once bitten, twice shy.
Explanation:  Someone who has suffered an injury will be in the future be very cautious of the cause.

7. Old sins cast long shadows.
Explanation: Current usage is likely to refer to the wrong done by one generation affecting its descendants,   






Posted by Questa Learn On 8/10/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Tuesday, August 9



A range of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverb that starts with letter R. 

1.  Revenge is a dish that can be eaten cold.
Explanation: Vengeance need not be immediately.
2.  Rome was not built in a day.
Explanation: Used to warn against trying to achieve too much at once.


Posted by Questa Learn On 8/09/2016 No comments READ FULL POST

Monday, August 8


A collection of English Proverbs with explanation.  Listed in alphabetical order by phrase.
This page contains English Proverbs that start with letter S.   

1.  Second thoughts are best.
Explanation: It is dangerous to act on one’s first impulse without due thought
2.  See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil
Explanation: Conventionally represented by “the three wise monkeys" covering their eyes, ears and mouth respectively with their hands and used particularly to imply a deliberate refusal to notice something that is wrong.   
3.  Set a thief to catch a thief
Explanation: Used to imply that the person best placed to catch someone out in dishonest practices is one whose own nature tends that way.   
4.  Soon ripe, soon rotten.
Explanation: A warning against talent/maturity, meaning that notably early achievement is unlikely to be long-lasting.
5.  Speech is silver, but silence is golden.
Explanation: Discretion can be more valuable than the most eloquent words. 
6. Stolen fruit are sweet.
Explanation: The knowledge that something is forbidden makes it more attractive. 
7.  Strike while the iron is hot.
Explanation: One should take advantage of opportunity
8.  Sing before breakfast, cry before night.
Explanation: Warning against overconfidence in early happiness presaging a reversal of good fortune..  
9.  Still waters run deep.
Explanation: Now commonly used to assert that a placid exterior hides a passionate nature. 
10.  Stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach.
Explanation: You should not spend more than you can afford.
11  Spare well and have to spend.
Explanation: The person who is and careful with their resources can use them lavishly when the occasion offers. 

12.  Success has many fathers, while failure is an orphan.
Explanation: Once something is seen to succeed many people will claim to have initiated it, while responsibility for failure is likely to be disclaimed. 





Posted by Questa Learn On 8/08/2016 No comments READ FULL POST
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Public Speaking

Public Speaking - Quick Tips

  1. Keep it short and sweet.
  2. Slow down: Don’t talk too fast.
  3. Look up! – It it’s too scary to look at the audience in the front row, look at the people in the back of the room.
  4. Smile : Look confident, even if you don’t feel confident.
  5. Pretend: Find a friendly face in the audience and pretend you’re only talking to that person.
  6. Practice: Join a debating team, dare yourself. To speak up in class, give a speech in front of a mirror. The more opportunities you have speak in public the easier it gets.
  7. Biggest asset: Self-confidence. Actas though you have a right to be there-because you do.

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